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Posts Tagged "Los Angeles Dodgers"

Are ghosts responsible for Vin Scully’s Hollywood Star being covered?

So Los Angeles Dodgers announcer, and baseball legend, Vin Scully has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He got the star in 1982 when he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

It is all deserved — Scully has called the Dodgers in Los Angeles for as long as there has been a Dodgers franchise in Los Angeles. He is just about universally considered the best baseball announcer ever.

It’s not a stretch to say that Scully is the most iconic Dodger in a franchise filled with iconic players. 

So when Roberto Baly, who writes the blog Vin Scully is my Homeboy, found that Scully’s star was covered by an ugly, ratty red carpet he was pissed.

At first they were giving a weak excuse saying there is construction being done. Which is funny because there isn’t any construction being done. And I wasn’t complaining that there was construction. If there was, I wouldn’t be complaining. I would understand. The problem is the red carpet and you can tell it’s been there for a while. 

This is where it gets weird. Tom Hoffarth at his farther of the wall blog notes that Scully’s star is in front of the Vogue Theater — which is purportedly haunted.

Chandler’s investigative work led him to the society’s website (linked here). There, it says that the Vogue Theatre, built in the 1930s next to the famed Musso & Frank restaurant, was once the site of an elementary school and textile factory - both of which burned down.

Ghostly activity ensued.

The spirit of someone named “Fritz,” who died in the projection room in the 1980s, still rattles around, as does “Danny,” a maintenance engineer who died of a drug overdose around the same time.

Six of the children from the Prospect Elementary School that burned down, along with their teacher, Miss Elizabeth, are still seen there.

Seats in the theatre go up and down for no apparent reason. Men have claimed to be pushed out of the way when going up the stairs.

So in other words, Scully’s star is covered because of ghosts. Or something.

Scully doesn’t care, though.

"I have no idea what’s going on there; I haven’t been down there since the star was put in," said Scully, who received the star in 1982, the same year he was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

If there is something there burying his fame, he said, “I just wish it were a blue carpet.”

No, the Dodgers aren’t moving back to Brooklyn

The news came down earlier this week that Major League Baseball was taking over day to day control of the Los Angeles Dodgers. It is the logical start of the end of the bizarre and horrible tenure of ownership of Frank and Jamie McCourt.

Of course, there will be some people who don’t realize that the Dodgers are one of the premiere franchises in all of baseball and, well, will never leave Los Angeles. When Los Angeles is split from the rest of the country by a massive earthquake like in Escape from L.A., the Dodgers will still be playing there.

A Forbes writer, Tom Van Riper, catering to the small audience of people who want the Dodgers to go back to Brooklyn after more than 50 years on the west coast, broached the subject of moving the Dodgers back to the east coast.

Hopefully Bud Selig was watching, because the obvious solution to his Dodgers-Mets problem was right there on his television screen. Really, it’s so obvious that it’s easy to overlook: move the Dodgers back to Brooklyn, and dissolve the Mets. Yeah, we know, as much as Angels owner Arte Moreno has been trying to make Los Angeles his solo baseball empire, leaving that big T.V. market with just one team won’t do.  No problem – the virtually homeless Oakland Athletics and Tampa Bay Rays can fight each other tooth and nail to see who gets to move in. That would leave a net contraction of one team, a result that Selig has bandied about before for his over-expanded league.

Mets owner Fred Wilpon, Selig’s pal and a former Brooklyn Dodger fanatic, won’t even mind. His new pad, Citi Field, already pays more homage to the Dodgers than to the Mets. Maybe he can even become a part owner, which he’s shortly to become with the Mets anyway. It’s the move New Yorkers have been waiting and praying for since Walter O’Malley abandoned them for the west coast a couple of generations ago.

This makes virtually no sense at all and could only come from someone who assumes the entire world revolves solely around New York.

Getting rid of one established New York team (the Mets have been around since 1962) and tearing Los Angeles’ longest-established sports franchise out of the city and sending another team over is an overly-complicated plan that makes it seem like only New York fans should get what they want. That is, unless they’re Mets fans.

Because they don’t count according to the sportswriters.

The Dodgers are a team that, with proper ownership, could make a large amount of money. They are in the nation’s second-largest media market. They consistently are at or near the top of attendance. They have an established west coast rivalry with the San Francisco Giants.

The Los Angeles Dodgers have had Koufax, the Kirk Gibson home run, Fernando Valenzuela, Tommy Lasorda and dozens of other legendary figures.  

They are baseball in Los Angeles, a city so desired that the Angels, who play in Anaheim, renamed themselves the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim to try to get a piece of the market.

Van Riper’s article is so dumb to be beyond words. It is so myopic, based out of reality and New York-centered that I wonder where he came up with it. 

In other words, it ain’t happening.

This is an awesome photo that I’d never seen before. 
Larry Sharkey of the Los Angeles Times snapped the above photo of the 1978 Los Angeles Dodgers celebrating winning the pennant. And in the background, a fan who rushed the field decided to take a souvenir.
Scott Harrison of the Times writes:

After hitting his run-scoring single in the bottom of the 10th, the Dodgers mob shortstop Bill Russell. During the celebration, several fans also rushed the field. One was caught by Sharkey trying to steal second base as a souvenir. The unidentified fan ended up the next morning all over Southern California on the front page of the Los Angeles Times.

This is an awesome photo that I’d never seen before. 

Larry Sharkey of the Los Angeles Times snapped the above photo of the 1978 Los Angeles Dodgers celebrating winning the pennant. And in the background, a fan who rushed the field decided to take a souvenir.

Scott Harrison of the Times writes:

After hitting his run-scoring single in the bottom of the 10th, the Dodgers mob shortstop Bill Russell. During the celebration, several fans also rushed the field. One was caught by Sharkey trying to steal second base as a souvenir. The unidentified fan ended up the next morning all over Southern California on the front page of the Los Angeles Times.

Dodgers on the brink: Owner has to borrow money to pay employees

Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt is apparently in a world of financial hurt, as he had to borrow $30 million from Fox to pay his employees according to the Los Angeles Times.

Wait, let me rephrase that.

The owner of one of the marquee North American sports franchises had to borrow money from Fox to pay his employees this month, reports the Los Angeles Times.

The arrangement is expected to cover the Dodgers’ expenses into next month. Commissioner Bud Selig has yet to say whether he will approve a proposed television contract between Fox and the Dodgers, which McCourt has presented as a long-term solution to the team’s financial troubles.

The loan marks the second time since the end of last season that Fox has provided money to the Dodgers’ owner so he could cover expenses. The loan was furnished to McCourt personally rather than to the Dodgers, according to the people briefed on the deal.

There aren’t many Dodgers fans who want Selig to approve the television contract. In fact, there shouldn’t be any. The Dodgers, in that media market, could get a huge TV contract that would let them compete with the teams in the AL and NL East when it comes to payroll (well payroll while making money at least).

McCourt has been a disaster for the Dodgers as an owner — and hopefully this is one of the last acts that we see from him as owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Columnist blames the victim for getting beat into a coma

I’m a Los Angeles Dodgers fan. I cheered for Manny Ramirez when he played here. I think Clayton Kershaw has a chance to be one of the best pitchers in baseball this year. I would give ten years of my own life to hear Vin Scully call another three years of Dodgers baseball.

I’ve lived through NewsCorp owning my team. I’m coping with the divorce of the current owners and watching it affect the Dodgers’ decision-making. And, two words, Andruw Jones.

But what happened to Bryan Stow was a low point. Stow is a Giants fan and wore his Giants jersey to Dodgers Stadium. For this offense, he was beaten by two Dodgers fans. He’s currently suffering from brain damage and is, last I saw, in a medically-induced coma. 

It is an embarrassment to all Dodgers fans (and, as Dodgers FYI said in an expletive-laden blog post, to owner Frank McCourt). But John Steigerwald decided that Stow was at fault for getting beaten to within an inch of his life.

Oh, and he can’t even get Stow’s name right.

Maybe someone can ask Snow, if he ever comes out of his coma, why he thought it was a good idea to wear Giants’ gear to a Dodgers’ home opener when there was a history of out-of-control drunkenness and arrests at that event going back several years.

Remember when it was the kids who were wearing the team jerseys to games? It was a common sight to see an adult male coming through the turnstile dressed as a regular human being with a kid dressed in a “real” jersey holding his hand.

Cute.

Are the 42-year-olds who find it necessary to wear their replica jerseys to a road game, those kids who are now fathers who haven’t grown up?

This comes on the heals of the Dodgers raising $61,000 for Stow’s medical bills and the Dodgers and Giants coming together for a pre-game message before the two teams resumed their rivalry in San Francisco on Monday.

It is amazing that Steigerwald could write such a horrible piece and even more horrible that he couldn’t be bothered enough to get the victim’s name right.