thoughts and links

Posts Tagged "Golf"

A golf official crashed a golf cart while moving the cart out of the way of the ball of a player on the Ladies European Tour.

Golf Cart City Online, which proves that there is a website for everything on the internet, has the description:

A European Tour official found this was the case on the Ladies European Tour during in the recent Turkish Ladies Open. German pro Anja Monke required a ruling at the 11th hole after her golf ball landed on a cart path. A golf cart had then stopped next to her ball, so she was advised by the rules official to mark it with a tee which would then allow another official to move the obstructing cart. However, the official moving the cart got into a bit of trouble….

Tip of the cap to @awfulannouncing. And I expect this will be on the Not Top Ten tomorrow on SportsCenter.

Jordan Spieth had a good reason to miss his high school graduation

Jordan Spieth didn’t get to walk onstage and accept his high school diploma. But his parents weren’t mad, because he had a pretty good reason:

By the time Jordan Spieth ’s third round at the HP Byron Nelson Championship had ended, his senior classmates were taking the stage at Jesuit College Prep’s graduation ceremony. But his day on the golf course kept him in contention going into the final round.

A pair of double-bogeys negated Spieth’s brilliant start — he birdied the first two holes to get to 5 under — but the Dallas teenager still was tied for eighth after the third round.The 17-year-old Spieth, who was tied for seventh going into last year’s final round as a junior at Jesuit College Prep, was four shots behind the leader Ryan Palmer after a round of 2-over 72 in windy conditions at TPC Four Seasons Las Colinas left him at 1 under for the tournament.

Spieth’s round ended about 4 p.m. CT on Saturday, the same time the other 245 boys in his senior class were beginning their graduation ceremony on the SMU campus about 20 miles away.

Because of expected traffic, Spieth’s mother said they wouldn’t try to get to the ceremony, which was also near the place where Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo was getting married.

That’s a PGA event and the high school senior is in contention to win it. He is going to the University of Texas, where he will obviously play golf, next year.

Man puts Gladwell to test; to practice 10,000 hours of golf, attempt to become pro

A man decided he was going to quit his job and become a professional golfer. He isn’t a great amateur golfer, didn’t golf in college or even high school. In fact, he had never golfed before.

But he decided to put the notion, popularized by Malcolm Gladwell’s book Outliers, that someone can become an expert at something by practicing for 10,000 hours. As Gladwell put it, that number is “the magic number of greatness.”

The man is Dan McLaughlin and he’s a year into his six-year plan.

When Dan first told his family about The Dan Plan, his father thought: In 10,000 hours, you could become a doctor. He wondered what to tell his son. Don’t quit the job you don’t like? Don’t gamble with your future? The actuary wanted to tell him those things. The father did not.

But Steve McLaughlin also didn’t think his son would take this as far as he has. Neither did his mother. Neither did his brother or his sister or his girlfriend.

"Dan’s always been an ideas guy," his brother, Matthew McLaughlin, said. "The fact that he would think of such a thing isn’t surprising. But ideas are one thing. Execution is another. He would get frustrated and quit."

At this point, though, more than 1,000 hours and nearly a year into the plan, they’re more than surprised. They’re impressed.

Can’t say that I’m not cheering for McLaughlin. 

Read the article for a profile on McLaughlin and his very odd way of learning how to play golf.

Poynter: Limerick on female reporter being denied entrance to Masters locker room

poynterinstitute:

The female reporters can’t gain
Fair access because an arcane

Club culture lets guys

Get all the best lies
To master Augusta’s domain.

-Limerick by John Dillon, inspired by Bergen Record reporter Tara Sullivan being denied access to the men’s locker room after the Masters at Augusta National.

This is a story that I’ve been following even though it seems to not have gained much mainstream attention. 

Source: poynterinstitute

.@JPosnanski takes on Augusta National barring a female reporter from doing her job

A very exciting Sunday afternoon at Augusta National was marred by a reminder that the sexist club is, indeed, still sexist when it barred a female reporter from the locker room to interview Rory McIlroy.

The golf club, which annually hosts The Masters, said it was a “misunderstanding” and apologized to the reporter, Tara Sullivan of The Bergen Record in New Jersey. 

The great sportswriter, probably the best sports writer currently working, took on the controversy on his blog.

I also have to admit I have a hard time building up much rage about the Augusta women membership issue. I don’t want my daughters to face closed doors and glass ceilings in their life. That’s one of the driving purposes of my life. On the other hand, I REALLY don’t want them to be members of Augusta National. A ludicrously rich group of men will not invite a ludicrously rich woman to join their ludicrously exclusive club with its shameful history of denying anyone even slightly different? That’s not in my world. 

But this — not allowing a woman to do her job because she’s a woman? That is in my world. And excluding women is not a “misunderstanding” at Augusta. The word is laughable. Excluding women is a policy. It’s an overriding theme of the place. Should the guard have known that women reporters during Masters week are an exception to that policy of no women allowed. I would hope so. Maybe she was told and forgot. Maybe not. But you know how they say it’s always easier to ask for forgiveness than permission. At Augusta National it’s easier to bar women first and declare misunderstandings later.

The rest of Posnanski’s posts, which is completely worth reading as is everything he writes, is about the vile state of internet commentary. Actually, internet commenting. You know about how horrible people who comment on the internet can be.*

"One of the touchstone issues of our era are the comments below stories you see on the Internet. They are sometimes vile, hateful, racist and sexist," Ponsnanski wrote. "They are sometimes mean-spirited, vicious, anonymous and cold-hearted. The are sometimes so crude and painful that you can’t help but hope that you do not live next door to any of these people."

Every once in a while I slip up and, stupidly, read the comments on an article on the internet. The times that this actually works out and I find some relevant, worthwhile information is vastly overshadowed by the amount of times that I tell myself, “Why!? Why would you read the comments!?”

Anyway, read what Posnanski wrote.

* XKCD summed it up pretty well here.

Augusta National bars female reporter from locker room interview

After a sports event, reporters gather in the locker room to interview the athletes. I know that golf is barely a sport, but at arguably golf’s premier event, The Masters, they don’t allow female reporters into the locker room after the tournament.

At least that’s what it looks like from a tweet from Tara Sullivan, a reporter for The Bergen Record in New Jersey:

Bad enough no women members at Augusta. But not allowing me to join writers in locker room interview is just wrong.

Later Sullivan tweeted that some “awesome” male colleagues provided her with their transcripts of the interview with Rory McIlroy.

Oh well, it’s not like Augusta National has had problems with its policy on women in the past.

Holmes-Watson match on tap. Elementary!

Heh. Best pairing of names that I can remember playing each other in a while.

It’s happening in, of all sports, golf. In the Match Play tournament in Arizona, Bubba Watson and J.B. Holmes will face off in the quarterfinals.

That sets up a Holmes-Watson quarterfinal that should be anything but elementary.

"It should be fun," Holmes said. "Me and Bubba move it out there pretty good."

Golf Posted 2/25/11 @ 6:06 PM #
OK, this guy is a genuine family guy. Mickelson, the second-best golfer in the world and the maximum model of being a good husband/family man* was golf’s best possible winner of The Masters. Mickelson is taking attention away from the chronic infidelity of Tiger Woods; would any other winner do that? Tiger Woods certainly wouldn’t. Maybe Fred Couples would.
But another reason that Mickelson is a great winner for golf and the PGA Tour is that Mickelson does stuff so ordinary** like going to Krispy Kreme with his kids.
Only, he wore the green jacket that he earned by winning The Masters hours earlier. You probably didn’t.
* One of the most tear-jerking parts of The Masters was the fact that Mickelson’s wife is recovering from cancer. See this to understand how impressive it was that Amy Mickelson made it to the final round of The Masters.

** and yet so awesome.

OK, this guy is a genuine family guy. Mickelson, the second-best golfer in the world and the maximum model of being a good husband/family man* was golf’s best possible winner of The Masters. Mickelson is taking attention away from the chronic infidelity of Tiger Woods; would any other winner do that? Tiger Woods certainly wouldn’t. Maybe Fred Couples would.

But another reason that Mickelson is a great winner for golf and the PGA Tour is that Mickelson does stuff so ordinary** like going to Krispy Kreme with his kids.

Only, he wore the green jacket that he earned by winning The Masters hours earlier. You probably didn’t.

* One of the most tear-jerking parts of The Masters was the fact that Mickelson’s wife is recovering from cancer. See this to understand how impressive it was that Amy Mickelson made it to the final round of The Masters.

** and yet so awesome.

The New York Times and a crappy article on The Masters

Trying to drum up controversy where there is none (and trying to accuse CBS of… well, trying to… uh, what were they trying to accuse CBS of?) is the New York Times:

CBS’s Jim Nantz echoed his “There it is, a win for the ages” declaration for Woods at the 1997 Masters when he said of Mickelson, “That’s a win for the family.”

In 1997, Tiger Woods broke a number of barriers. From a 1997 Sports Illustrated article on that historic Masters victory by Tiger:

Someday Eldrick (Tiger) Woods, a mixed-race kid with a middle-class background who grew up on a municipal course in the sprawl of Los Angeles, may be hailed as the greatest golfer who ever lived, but it is likely that his finest day will always be the overcast Sunday in Augusta when he humiliated the world’s best golfers, shot 18-under-par 70-66-65-69-270 (the lowest score in tournament history) and won the Masters by a preposterous 12 shots. It was the soundest whipping in a major this century and second only to Old Tom Morris’s 13-shot triumph in the 1862 British Open.

This is not to excuse anything that Tiger has done since then (you know what I’m talking about), but the fact that the New York Times tried to manufacture drama out of this statement by Nantz is pretty ridiculous. 

The rest of the article talks about how CBS treated Tiger like he has been treated at every tournament for the last decade and a half; he has been basically a man among boys at golf. Tiger has won 14 majors (the second-most in history behind only the legendary Jack Nicklaus), including that masterful Masters win in 1997. He has won 71 tournaments, the third most, behind only Nicklaus and Jack Snead. Tiger has won nearly 30 percent of the tournaments he has entered.

And because of his infidelity, Tiger has become the most infamous athlete in the world (or at the very least the United States) since November. So the New York Times tries to fault CBS for concentrating on the person that the media, the New York Times included, has been covering in excruciating detail for months?

Seriously, they should be better than that. 

AP wins “dumbest Tiger Woods article of the day” award

I get that Tiger Woods is suddenly the least popular guy this side of Jesse James, but this hand-wringing, idiotic short article from the Associated Press shows that the press will take any excuse to write about Tiger and his infidelity.

Expect even more dumb article like this in the coming days as Tiger Woods gets ready to play in The Masters on Thursday. And if he struggles (as he very well could since he hasn’t played competitive golf in months) the idiotic articles will multiple exponentially.

Being caught on camera, cell phone in hand, by an Associated Press photographer probably wasn’t the best thing for Woods, who spent the previous day kicking off a campaign to rehabilitate his image.

Seriously — the AP thinks that pictures of Woods doing something that about 99 percent of the United States over the age of fifteen does every day (hold a cell phone) is bad for his image because of the, um, explicit text messages that Woods sent to his mistresses.

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, AP.